Cucumis Sativus (Cucumber) Fruit Extract

A soothing, cooling, and emollient extract derived from cucumbers. Cucumber has been used in skincare for centuries and is used to treat skin problems such as eye swelling, sunburn, and itchy and irritated skin.
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Origin
Cucumis Sativus (Cucumber) Fruit Extract

Overview

Cucumis sativus fruit extract is extracted from cucumber fruits (yes ā€“ that cucumber). They are a common vegetable with a long history of use in skincare. You can find cucumber fruit extract in many different skincare products and it is used as a soothing, cooling, and emollient ingredient.

Cucumber has been used in skincare for centuries. The whole cucumber, pressed juice, and extract are used for their cooling and soothing properties to help treat skin problems such as eye swelling, sunburn, and itchy and irritated skin. Cucumber pulp has also been used for skin cleaning and pigmentation issues.

So far, scientific experiments have identified several beneficial compounds from cucumber fruits that might be responsible for these effects. A fresh cucumber contains mainly water (95%), mucilage, minerals, vitamin C, B, and special, bitter-tasting compounds called cucurbitacins, which are still under research. The seeds of the fruit contain a fatty oil comprised mainly of palmitic and linoleic acid.

There is not much specialized research dedicated to its benefits in skincare, but one study suggests that cucumber extract is able to slow down the degradation of hyaluronic acid and elastin, which would make it a potential anti-wrinkle and anti-aging ingredient.

Another study suggests that the lutein contained in the cucumber extract is able to inhibit melanin synthesis, which would make it a potential anti-pigment ingredient. This research, however, was done in vitro (meaning in a laboratory and not on humans), and so we cannot be 100% sure of the results.

Nevertheless, the fruit's long history in skincare supports its benefits and safety in skincare products.

Science

1
Fiume, M. M., et al. (2014). Safety Assessment of Cucumis sativus (Cucumber)-Derived Ingredients as Used in Cosmetics. International Journal of Toxicology, 33(2_suppl), 47Sā€“64S.
2
Nema, N. K., Maity, N., Sarkar, B., & Mukherjee, P. K. (2010). Cucumis sativus fruit-potential antioxidant, anti-hyaluronidase, and anti-elastase agent. Archives of Dermatological Research, 303(4), 247ā€“252.
3
Kai, H., Baba, M., & Okuyama, T. (2008). Inhibitory effect of Cucumis sativus on melanin production in melanoma B16 cells by downregulation of tyrosinase expression. Planta medica, 74(15), 1785ā€“1788.